Categories
Customer Needs Leadership Nudge

Negative Nudges – with positive results

angry man

Ok, this week I felt like I received some personal nudges that were a bit negative.

One was actually negative – a one star review on one of my online courses. I already wrote a blogpost about that one.

The other wasn’t actually negative, but it did force to get to clearer on my purpose for Nudge Village. Come to think of it, I actually wrote a blogpost about that one as well. You know, the post about “burning the ships?”
Day 39 :: my own worst enemy
Obviously, those “negative” nudges ended up being pretty powerful for me.

Why?

  • Embarrassment – They embarrassed me just a bit. After all, I’m a “Chief Nudger,” and a “Nudge Strategist.” I want to do good work and make a difference.
  • Lead by Example – Most of my day job involves leadership, management and mentoring. Yet, I couldn’t get my own website and products to clearly meet the needs of my audience? Practicing what I preach would be a first good step toward leading by example.
  • Prioritize It – I’ve been incredibly busy. Too busy. But, I have so many ideas. Why not follow them all at once? Right? Wrong. Instead of starting multiple disparate projects, it is time to get clear on 1-2 and …finish them.
  • Focus – What will the 1-2 ideas be? I’ve got to push aside what all the voices are saying (no, not in my head – all the social network voices) and decide what fits me and what fits my audience. Who is my audience anyway? Exactly. Focus.

 

Thank you shout out to the Negative Nudgers

So, I must say thank you to the negative nudgers today. They embarrassed me. I’m now back to leading by example. I’m prioritizing. I’m focusing. I re-arranged my website. I burned some ships (in the form of confusing webpages). I’ve included some new tips in my Authenticity on Twitter course. I’ve had new ideas about what to offer within my more focused website.

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p class=”impact-text”>Don’t disregard them in the future

They may embarrass you. They may make you angry. But, emotion can be good. It can lead to self-improvement. It can lead to more insights and reflection. It can lead to more blogposts on your blog about how the negative nudge changed you. Ha.

I’d say “bring ’em on,” but I have a feeling there will be more negative nudges that will come all too naturally.

For now, I’m going to use them as turning points that keep me on a growth path.

Onward and Upward…..

Categories
Customer Needs Customer Relations

Blah, Blah, Blah – that’s the feedback she gave me

thumbs downEverything was moving along just fine yesterday until I opened up my online course and saw that my feedback rating went down from 4.5 stars to 4.0.  Weird. What could have triggered this in my account?

I opened it up to see some freshly added feedback from one of the newer students in my online course.

She shared publicly and ….so will I.

negative feedback

It’s hard to read people like this, especially after I’ve had a few good reviews AND because I’m not sure that the person got the spirit of the course. I say this because I see people NOT understanding how to use Twitter all over the place – not engaging in online conversations, not promoting others, and not leveraging it in the way actual business people build partnerships.

But, these pieces of feedback do cause me to sit back and ask myself questions – is my course labeled incorrectly, did I share enough stories, what more needs to be added for different learning styles? Maybe I need to add a few more technical components that I figured were taught elsewhere?

On the flip side of the cognitive dilemma is the fact that I really want to create things for the right people to enjoy. Part of me wants to disregard this person. Part of me wants to use it as a chance to improve my course.

We all hear talk about the importance of continuing to move forward on our big ideas despite the naysayers, but it does make me blush whenever I come across a piece of feedback about me that is less than satisfactory.

So, what action will I take as a result of this virtual jab at my course?

Well, I plan on:

  • Adding a few more details (that I had intended to add anyway) to make it more robust.
  • Give a few technical tips on how to use it on a daily basis.
  • Share a few more examples of success in the course.
  • Tweet out a few more tweets for those that provided positive feedback.

Now, for another lesson learned from this experience – are we watching what type of feedback we put out there on the web? Do we think of how it will reflect on us? I obviously don’t have a high opinion of the commenter that I’ve highlighted here. Her form of communicating doesn’t invite any discussion or constructive input.

Sad, isn’t it?

There are others that offered really helpful feedback on how to improve the course and I respect them for their input and openness. I actually tweet about many of their products now.

When we give feedback (on or off the web), we may do well to remember that our reputation is at stake as well. How we respond often says more about us than the other person.

Our online reputations must be guarded daily nowadays. We never know what future opportunity that could be stifled by trivial or rude remarks made online. It is what it is.

I’ll move on and keep improving and will still keep blushing when I get less than great scores on online courses. I hope that those that write reviews like this one do too. Unfortunately, I cannot support them or give them any online promotion. It is too bad, because they probably desperately need it.

One last note – kind of a funny thing – I talked about building your online reputation in the course. Guess that was hidden in all of the blah-blah-blah somewhere. (-:

Categories
Inspiration Marketing

Clarity Nudges

Yesterday I had another encounter with one of the people I wrote about in the Feedback Makes Me Angry post.

The person said that they still didn’t understand what I was trying to do with one of the initiatives that I’m leading. He asked if I could explain what it was, why we were doing it and what value it gave to him, our faculty and to the workforce that we serve. I have to admit that I couldn’t do it. Perhaps if I hadn’t been in the midst of an interrogation, I might have been able to blurt something out. But, these conversations can incapacitate my speech capabilities. A photo with a flower under a magnifying glass

…for a few minutes.

The real concern is that the person was having difficulty sharing the message with his leadership. So, he was a bit frustrated that I hadn’t clarified it for him so that he could clarify it for his leadership.

I was a bit annoyed because I had gone to such great efforts to create presentations, hold meetings, etc.

But, I did go home and create a draft executive summary. After all, I’m the Chief Nudger. I should be aware when people are trying to nudge me in the right direction. (-:

Inspiration for this draft came quickly. I even stayed home until my first meeting so I could focus. Was it perfect? Heavens no. Draft mode for sure. But, it was the act of putting it down that helped me start to clarify what the message was and how we could go about sharing it.

Tonight I have an even better draft and I think I’ll send it out to some co-workers for modifications and discussion. After all, I need them to understand the message so they can share it with their stakeholders and leaders.

Be grateful for those that have the courage to be honest with you. They help you more than you know.

In fact, some of the lessons learned in that environment are helping me clarify what I want to do with Nudge Village going forward.

Stay tuned!